FIS issues technical guidance on requirements to record and photograph junctions to the external wall

FIS issues technical guidance on requirements to record and photograph junctions to the external wall

Recent changes to Part L Conservation of fuel and power come into effect on 15 June 2022 where you are working in residential buildings.

From Wednesday 15 June a requirement to provide photographic evidence of junction of internal walls to external envelope of a building come into force. FIS has produced a technical note to provide members with information and advice on how to meet this requirement.

Part L requirements to record and photograph junctions to the external wall

FIS members can download this guidance, and many others in our Technical Hub.

LEXiCON project takes a significant step toward a common approach to construction product information

LEXiCON project takes a significant step toward a common approach to construction product information

The conclusion of LEXiCON’s first phase is a major step toward creating trustworthy and reliable, digital structured product information in a standardised way across the industry.

Developed by the Construction Innovation Hub (the Hub), in partnership with the Construction Products Association (CPA), the LEXiCON project is seeking to standardise construction product information and support manufacturers in sharing product information freely across the industry.

Detailed in a report published today, the first phase of LEXiCON sets out a methodology for the creation and ongoing management of ‘Product Data Templates’. By creating a consistent approach across the building industry, LEXiCON will make it easier for people to upload, categorise and compare data between products. You can find out more information about this latest step from LEXiCON here.

Changing legislation in Scotland

Changing legislation in Scotland

Developers in Scotland will be banned from using combustible cladding on high‐rise buildings from 1 June, following the introduction of new building standards legislation. Since 2005, new cladding systems on high‐rise blocks of flats have either had to use non‐combustible materials or pass a large‐scale fire test. However, the new legislation removes the option of the fire test, prohibiting such materials from being used on domestic and other high‐risk buildings above 11 metres. The highest risk metal composite cladding material will be banned from all new buildings whatever their height, with replacement cladding also required to meet the new standards.

FIS has reviewed the proposals and note that Cavity Trays that caused some disruption in England and Wales are in the list of exemptions and consistent with the work we did with Scottish Government on buildings greater than 18 m.

Scottish Procurement Policy Note (SPPN) 02/2022 will also be introduced from 1 June, which sets out how public sector bodies are to embed prompt payment performance in the supply chain through procurement processes. Suppliers will have to pay 95% of valid invoices on time, or provide an improvement plan, otherwise they will not be selected to bid.

FIS publish technical guidance on the use of frameless glazing when used as guarding

FIS publish technical guidance on the use of frameless glazing when used as guarding

FIS has launched a technical guidance note, Guarding with frameless glass partitioning to help specifiers, designers, manufacturers and specialist contractors fully understand the unique challenges of utilising full height frameless glazed partitions as a barrier.

The new FIS technical note was produced by the FIS on behalf of its members and peer reviewed by the wider community in response to ongoing feedback on the specific overlap between this product category and it’s intended use which is not well described or prescribed by standards or regulations. The document also gives examples of how to harmonise the approach to performance across devolved nations where the guidance that exists can vary. 

Commenting on the need for guidance Peter Long of Optima Systems said:

“We need to be advocating the same degree of risk management in guarding as we do with fire. Both areas of construction are protecting risks to life, so both should have the same levels of attention to safe design.”

This supports the need to consider this product to be a clear example of a safety critical product.

Referenced and associated FIS publications:

The unintentional designer

Spontaneous breakages of toughened glass

FIS acoustic verification scheme

Best practice guide for installing partitions

These guides work well when they are included in proposals and project plans to demonstrate how to best approach a project. They are also good differentiators when someone is in competition with non-members, and are an excellent introduction to new members of the team and any trainees and apprentices.

The guidance note is freely accessible to FIS members and to specifiers on request. Visit the Technical Guidance section on the webiste at https://www.thefis.org/knowledge-hub/technical/fis-technical-notes-industry-alerts/

FIS launch Specifiers Guide to Partitioning

FIS launch Specifiers Guide to Partitioning

FIS has launched a Specifiers’ Guide to Partitioning to help specification writers fully understand the criteria when writing a specification for partitioning, including moveable walls and pods.

The Specifiers’ Guide to Partitioning was produced by the FIS Partitioning and Pods Working Group which comprises representation from manufacturers, designers and contractors working in the sector. Pulling together decades of experience, this guide is the fourth in the series of guides and is designed to help specifiers and designers understand the questions that should be addressed before the specification can be produced and then how the specification should be structured, and which standards referenced.

Commenting on the guide, Iain McIlwee, Chief Executive of FIS said:

“Specifying partitioning seems, on the face of it, simple enough: consider the look, performance and cost, and there it is. If only it were that simple there would not be cases where inappropriate glass was used in guarding or the partition wasn’t performing acoustically because the flanking paths hadn’t been addressed”.

The guide explains the vast range of product options and how careful specification can help with relocatability in the building as well as enjoying enhanced tax benefits as well as reference material to regulations for safety, fire performance and standards.

“A well written specification not only ensures the installation meets the client’s requirements, but it also means the specifier’s requirements are less open to interpretation, which is key for the whole supply chain if they are going to deliver the quality and detail first time, on time,” added Iain McIlwee.

The guide sits alongside other FIS best practice guides that relate to partitioning:

FIS Acoustic Verification Scheme – FIS (thefis.org)

Best practice guide for installing Partitioning

Servicing operable walls

These guides work well when they are included in proposals and project plans to demonstrate how to best approach a project. They are also good differentiators when someone is in competition with non-members, and are an excellent introduction to new members of the team and any trainees and apprentices.

FIS plans to have CPD material to accompany the guide later in the year.

You can download the Specifiers’ Guide to Partitioning at www.thefis.org/membership-hub/publications/specifiers-guides/partitioning/

For further information or for any questions please contact the FIS at info@thefis.org or call 0121 707 0077.

Industry bodies launch labels to warn of the dangers of passing cables and pipes through compartment walls

Industry bodies launch labels to warn of the dangers of passing cables and pipes through compartment walls

The leading trade bodies representing fire protection, the fit-out and interiors sector and plasterboard manufacturers have come together to warn of the dangers in passing cables and pipes through firewalls used for compartments in buildings.

FIS joined forces with the Association for Specialist Fire Protection (ASFP) and the Gypsum Products Development Association (GPDA) to launch a labelling initiative to provide instant guidance on what to do when considering whether and how to pass cables and pipes through compartment walls.

One of the biggest issues facing M&E contractors who are employed to pass services through a building, is that they may not be aware that the partitions they need to pass through are fire rated, and any holes cut into them will negate the performance of the partition. This may allow smoke fumes and fire to pass through from one compartment to another, which could lead to loss of life, extensive damage to the building and have huge impacts on any business.

Often the route for these services is at high level through the void above ceilings, so the new labels will be placed on the firewall in the ceiling void by the contractors so that any facility manager, M&E or cabling contractor will be instantly aware of the performance of the compartment wall and importantly, where to find guidance in future.

The labels can be printed from a downloable pdf available at www.thefis.org/knowledge-hub/technical/fire-protection/firestopping/fire-labelling/

ASFP, FIS and GPDA all believe that this simple initiative is not only good practice but has the potential to save lives and property.