Working In The Trade

Ceiling Fixer

Ceiling fixers install suspended ceiling systems in new and existing buildings, working from platforms or scaffolding which they may erect and dismantle themselves. They work from drawings, instruction sheets and site measurements and use a variety of tools.

 

Newly trained ceiling fixers can earn in the region of £17,000 – £20,000

Trained with experience ceiling fixers can earn in the region of £20,000 – £35,000

Salaries typically depend on location, employer and any overtime you may do.  Many ceiling fixers will become self-employed and day-rates can lead to earnings significantly higher than these rates.

More information on becoming a ceiling fixer is available on Go Construct Here.

There are no formal qualifications needed to start training as a ceiling fixer, it is, however, generally recommended to complete Standard Grades/National 4 or 5s/GCSEs in English, mathematics and a technological subject.

Some ceiling fixers may complete a SVQ/NVQ Level 2 in Interior Systems to enter the profession, while others may complete a construction apprenticeship for a ceiling fixer firm.

To find out more about training to become a Ceiling Fixer click here.

Dryliner

Dryliners build the internal walls in all types of buildings by using metal stud partitioning and plasterboard sheets. This role can also be combined with traditional plastering as a finishing stage.

  • Newly trained dryliners can earn in the region of £17,000 – £20,000
  • Trained with experience dryliners will earn in the region of £20,000 – £30,000

Salaries are a guideline only do depend on location, employer and any overtime you may do, senior or master dryliners can earn more.   Dryliners often go on to become self-employed and work on a day rate can yield significantly higher income for competent individuals.

More information on becoming a Dryliner is available on Go Construct Here.

There are no set qualifications to train as a dryliner but it helps to have Standard Grades/National 4 or 5s, GCSEs/Standard Grades 9-4 (A*- C) in maths and English, or their equivalent such as the Welsh Baccalaureate. These can be useful in the job but aren’t essential.

Employers such as construction companies and construction agencies will be more interested in those who have on-site experience. If you don’t have any, you can start out as a labourer before an employer trains you as a dryliner.

Otherwise, you can think about taking a college course to learn drylining, such as the Level 1, 2 & 3 Diplomas in Dry Lining.

To find out more about training to become a Dryliner click here.

Partition Fixer

Partition fixers install relocatable partition systems, which divide work areas and internal spaces within buildings. This can include just about any commercial project that requires internal partitions.

  • Newly trained Partitioning Systems Operatives can earn in the region of £12,000 – £15,000
  • Trained with experience Partitioning Systems Operatives can earn in the region of £16,000 – £24,000
  • Self-employed Partitioning Systems Operatives can exceed these rates.

Salaries depend on location, employer and any overtime you may do.

More information on becoming a partition systems operative is available on Go Construct Here.

GCSE or equivalent such as the Welsh Baccalaureate in Maths and English are important because you need to use precise measurements and follow instructions carefully.

You could then do an NVQ Level 2 in Interior Systems (Construction) – Partitioning and move on to a Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Occupational Work Supervision to gain the right skills for this career.

 To find out more about training to become a Partition Fixer click here.

Raised Access Floorer

Raised access flooring fitters install raised floor systems. This can include just about any project that requires raised floorings – from houses to nightclubs to airports.

    • Newly trained floor layers can earn in the region of £17,000 – £20,000
    • Trained with experience floor layers can earn in the region of £20,000 – £30,000
    • Senior or master floor layers can earn in the region of £30,000 – £35,000

    Salaries depend on location, employer and any overtime you may do. Self-employed workers can earn significantly more.

    More information on becoming a floor layer is available on Go Construct Here.

     

There are no formal qualification requirements to begin a career as a Floor Layer. However, GCSE grades 9-4 (A* – C) in English and Maths are highly beneficial. Maths skills are particularly important for measuring floor areas and calculating material requirements with minimal wastage.

There are several courses that enable you to enter a career in Floor Laying:

  • The Floorlayer Apprenticeship Standard in available in England, this is a 30-36 month apprenticeship
  • The Floorcovering Occupations (Construction) Modern Apprenticeship in Scotland, this is a 4 year apprenticeship
  • Short courses delivered by the Flooring Industry Training Association (FITA) who are a not for profit organisation supported by the Contract Flooring Association (CFA) and the National Institute of Carpet and Floorlayers (NICF)
  • Short upskilling courses delivered by FeRFA, these are aimed at experienced floorlayers
  • Experienced workers can upskill through the On Site Assessment and Training (OSAT) route

Most Floor Layers start out by joining a company as an apprentice and training on the job. Construction Apprentices in England and Wales will work towards an NVQ Level 2 or 3 in Floorcovering.

For Resin Flooring, there are three Specialist Apprenticeship Programmes delivered by FeRFA, leading to an NVQ Level 2 Diploma.

 To find out more about training to become a Floor Layer click here.

Plasterer

  • Being part of a small team, and doing either solid or fibrous plastering
  • Applying wet finishes to surfaces and putting protective coverings such as pebble-dashing on external walls
  • Mixing and applying different kinds of plaster to inside walls and ceilings
  • Creating ornamental plasterwork (such as ceiling roses and cornices) using a mixture of plaster and short fibres shaped with moulds and casts
  • Newly trained plasterers can earn in the region of £19,000 – £25,000
  • Trained with experience plasterers can earn in the region of £25,000 – £35,000
  • Senior plasterers and those going on to do advanced work (e.g. Heritage) can earn in excess of £35,000

Salaries depend on location, employer and any overtime you may do. Self-employed workers can exceed the salary expectation show nere.

More information on becoming a plasterer is available on Go Construct Here.

There are no set qualifications to become a plasterer, but employers usually expect four GCSEs grades 9-4 (A* – C), or the Scottish or Welsh equivalent.

A common way into plastering is through an apprenticeship scheme with a plastering firm. The range of apprenticeships available in your area will depend on the local jobs market and the types of skills employers need from their workers.

If you cannot get on to an apprenticeship, there are college courses where you can study a qualification such as Level 1,2 & 3 Diploma in Plastering.

To find out more about training to become a Plasterer click here.

Labourer

A labourer carries out manual work on a construction site and requires good physical strength and fitness. The role can be physically dangerous depending on the nature of the construction, therefore safety precautions need to be adhered to.

The starting salary for an apprentice or novice labourer is around £14,000, depending on demand. Once qualified and experienced, this usually rises to around £23,000, with more experienced labourers earning around £28,000. It is common to be paid by the hour or day rather than by a set salary.

Most labourers learn their trade through experience or an apprenticeship, having completed a minimum level of Maths and English. Most contractors will tend to want some on-site experience. Alternatively, college courses can be completed before engaging in ‘hands-on’ experience; these can also be completed whilst working.